TRANSITION MANAGEMENT

Session 1: The transition to a circular fashion industry
Roel van Raak, Senior advisor and business manager Drift, Erasmus University
Sophie Buchel, Advisor & Researcher Drift, Erasmus University
Douwe Jan Joustra, Head Circular Transformation, C&A-Foundation

The deeply rooted issues in the global fashion industry call for solutions that fundamentally challenge the current status quo. The challenge for material circularity is intertwined with challenges for social sustainability. Currently, the movement towards a more sustainable fashion industry is accelerating with increasing pre-competitive collaboration and a broadening variety of alternative practices, materials and business models that pave the way for the fashion industry of the future. Yet, there are also signs of initiative fatigue and slow progress towards transformational change. In this session, we will present preliminary results from a study done by DRIFT for C&A Foundation and their partner Fashion for Good, on a collaborative ‘systems change map’, which identified levers for transformative change towards a regenerative and restorative fashion industry, including first steps. But especially, we would like to the engage the participants to sharpen this vision and connect their own initiatives and insights to it. We will end the session with together identifying further opportunities for business and to accelerate the transition.

Session 2: the transition to regional circular economies and societal innovation.
Roel van Raak, Senior advisor and business manager Drift, Erasmus University
Sophie Buchel, Advisor & Researcher Drift, Erasmus University

Our current linear economy is highly global in nature: for centuries, our global trade grew exponentially. For the circular economy, the jury is still out if global linear flows will be replaced by local material cycles, as the balance in trade-offs between local and remote production might shift. Regional or local circular economies and other developments such as increasing value being placed upon local origin of products and geo-political regional autonomy could mutually reinforce each other.

Many regional governments, business (associations) and researcher are in local practice translating such potential long-term paradigm shifts, to down-to-earth local opportunities at the level of individual businesses and small potential circular chains. Also at this regional level, we see an increasing interest in the social enterprise and other hybrid forms of the ‘third sector’. This session reflects on developments in Dutch region from the perspective of fundamental transitions to circularity, but also in our economy. But also aims to share experiences amongst participants on regional circular developments elsewhere and identify together new opportunities.